Operating Systems Architecture

Operating Systems Architecture

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The Shell

Learning objective: Explain the role of the shell

kernel
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The shell provides the interface to the operating system

A shell is a piece of software that provides an interface for users to an operating system which provides access to the services of a kernel. However, the term is also applied very loosely to applications and may include any software that is "built around" a particular component, such as web browsers and email clients that are "shells" for HTML rendering engines. The name shell originates from shells being an outer layer of interface between the user and the innards of the operating system (the kernel). [Wikipedia]

Operating system shells generally fall into one of two categories: command-line and graphical. Command-line shells provide a command-line interface (CLI) to the operating system, while graphical shells provide a graphical user interface (GUI). In either category the primary purpose of the shell is to invoke or "launch" another program; however, shells frequently have additional capabilities such as viewing the contents of directories. [Wikipedia]

The relative merits of CLI and GUI based shells are often debated. CLI proponents claim that certain operations can be performed much faster under CLI shells than under GUI shells (such as moving files, for example). However, GUI proponents advocate the comparative usability and simplicity of GUI shells. The best choice is often determined by the way in which a computer will be used. On a server mainly used for data transfers and processing with expert administration, a CLI is likely to be the best choice. On the other hand, a GUI would be more appropriate for a computer to be used for image or video editing and the development of the above data. [Wikipedia]

Graphical user interface (GUI)

A graphical user interface (GUI) (sometimes pronounced "gooey") is a type of user interface item that allows people to interact with programs in more ways than typing such as computers; hand-held devices such as MP3 Players, Portable Media Players or Gaming devices; household appliances and office equipment with images rather than text commands. A GUI offers graphical icons, and visual indicators, as opposed to text-based interfaces, typed command labels or text navigation to fully represent the information and actions available to a user. The actions are usually performed through direct manipulation of the graphical elements [Wikipedia]

Typically, the user interacts with information by manipulating visual widgets that allow for interactions appropriate to the kind of data they hold. The widgets of a well-designed interface are selected to support the actions necessary to achieve the goals of the user. A Model-view-controller allows for a flexible structure in which the interface is independent from and indirectly linked to application functionality, so the GUI can be easily customized. This allows the user to select or design a different skin at will, and eases the designer's work to change the interface as the user needs evolve. Nevertheless, good user interface design relates to the user, not the system architecture. [Wikipedia]

Command line interface (CLI)

A command-line interface (CLI) is a mechanism for interacting with a computer operating system or software by typing commands to perform specific tasks. This text-only interface contrasts with the use of a mouse pointer with a graphical user interface (GUI) to click on options, or menus on a text user interface (TUI) to select options. This method of instructing a computer to perform a given task is referred to as "entering" a command: the system waits for the user to conclude the submitting of the text command by pressing the "Enter" key (a descendant of the "carriage return" key of a typewriter keyboard). A command-line interpreter then receives, analyses, and executes the requested command. The command-line interpreter may be run in a text terminal or in a terminal emulator window as a remote shell client such as PuTTY. Upon completion, the command usually returns output to the user in the form of text lines on the CLI. This output may be an answer if the command was a question, or otherwise a summary of the operation. [Wikipedia]

CLIs are often used by programmers and system administrators, in engineering and scientific environments, and by technically advanced personal computer users. CLIs are also popular among people with visual disability, since the commands and feedbacks can be displayed using Refreshable Braille displays. [Wikipedia]


✏ Self Quiz!

Select the best response(s) for each question/statement. Use this opportunity to test *your* knowledge and not just move on...

1) Which is true about shells?
The GUI uses widgets
The CLI uses text
The shell is responsible for processing

2) The CLI...
is often used by system administrators
can easily be used with a remote server
is great for working with images

.


Thinking: If you could only have one shell, which one would you chose and why?

Key terms: , CLI, GUI, kernel, shell

Resources:
To maximize your learning, please visit these Web sites and review their content to help reinforce the concepts presented in this section.

Quick links:
Shell @ Wikipedia
Graphical user interface @ Winipedia
Command-line interface @ Wikipedia

Embedded Resources

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Shell @ Wikipedia | Reload page | If frame is empty, click on the link to view the page in a new tab or window

Graphical user interface @ Winipedia | Reload page | If frame is empty, click on the link to view the page in a new tab or window

Command-line interface @ Wikipedia | Reload page | If frame is empty, click on the link to view the page in a new tab or window

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